Of Interest to UD Community: CFPs, etc.

Calls for Papers are listed in chronological order according to their deadlines for submissions.
Symposium Announcements are below.


Title: Posthuman Materialisms: Knowledge, Economy, Ecology
Where: EGSA, Georgetown University
Deadline: February 13, 2017

“[N]ow may be the time,” as Teresa de Lauretis suggests, “for the human sciences to reopen the questions of subjectivity, materiality, discursivity, [and] knowledge, to reflect on the post of posthumanity.” She goes on to enumerate the various “schemata” to which that reopening applies, a list that is, unsurprisingly, a long one. As scholars reconsider their own disciplines in light of the “nonhuman turn,” the question of what comes next becomes increasingly pressing. What’s more, escalating global temperatures and rising sea levels have urged thinkers, from the mechanical sciences to the humanities, to move beyond traditional methodologies to consider their fields of study from increasingly interdisciplinary vantage points. Given this confluence, the English Graduate Student Association of Georgetown University seeks proposals from various disciplines and theoretical approaches addressing, but not limited to, the following questions: How do new materialist theories think through the increasingly complex global systems—economic, technological, and environmental in scope—impacted by anthropogenic climate change? To what extent can posthumanist theory and emerging disciplines like critical animal studies challenge or even collapse the subject-object division inherent to Enlightenment epistemology? In refusing the confines of a traditional subject-object divide, how might a reconsideration of these non-human agents allow us to reconceive our failures within the political arena or the ramifications such a failure might entail? How might we rethink historical periods, and especially literary periodization, along the lines of energy regimes? How are terms like “nature” and “environment” employed or circulated as discursive constructs that affect human bodies, knowledges, and spaces? In what ways does a reconsideration of the nonhuman world—of animals and inanimate objects as agents in and of themselves—shape our understanding of science, methodology, or historicity? We are particularly interested in papers that investigate burgeoning technologies in relation to research methods in the humanities, as well as in studies that integrate approaches or methodologies less common in humanistic inquiry. Proposals may also be considered for inclusion in Predicate, EGSA’s interdisciplinary journal in the humanities, which will be published in spring 2017.

The conference will be held on Saturday, April 8, 2017.

Submissions should be sent via email by February 13, 2017, to the following address: egsa@georgetown.edu. Conference proposals should consist of 250-500 words and include a short biographical statement with academic affilication. Article or other prose submissions for the journal should be 15-25 pages, double-spaced, in standard size and font (Times New Roman or Garamond preferred). Article proposals and pitches for reviews or personal essays are also acceptable. Poetry submissions may consist of 3-5 poems. Include a cover letter. Journal submissions are accepted on a rolling basis. Please address conference submissions to Emily Coccia, Academic Chair, and journal submissions to John James, Editor of Predicate. If submitting for both the conference and the journal, please note so in the body of your email.

Feel free to email us at egsa@georgetown.edu with any questions.


Title: Good, Fast, Cheap: Printed Words & Images in America before 1900
When: October 6-7, 2017
Where: American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts
Deadline: March 15, 2017

Call for Proposals

APHA and CHAViC invite proposals that explore the production, distribution, reception, and survival of printed words and images in America to 1900. In an era in which the process of design had not been separated from production, the purpose of the conference is to explore the inter-relation between composition, design, and printing processes.
 The goal of clear communication was often coupled with a deadline and a budget. In the face of these constraints, printers used the materials and equipment at their disposal to design and produce necessary items in the service of democracy, education, science, commerce, entertainment, and the arts. The inventiveness and problem solving resulted in work ranging from the pedestrian to the sublime and that might, when considered carefully, offer lessons for today’s communications environment. How can the past inform the present and the future? How can the study of continuity and change through printing history inform contemporary design?
 Proposals are encouraged from disparate disciplines including art history, American studies, book arts, graphic design, practicing artists and printers, history, English, childhood studies, and material culture studies.

Sara T. Sauers, APHA VP for Programs | printinghistory.org | sara-sauers@uiowa.edu
Nan Wolverton, CHAViC Director, AAS | americanantiquarian.org | nwolverton@mwa.org


Title: The Room Where It Happens: On the Agency of Interior Spaces
When: October 13-14, 2017
Where: Harvard Art Museums
Deadline: April 15, 2017

Keynote Speaker:
Louis Nelson, University of Virginia

This symposium, held in conjunction with the Harvard Art Museum’s forthcoming exhibition, The Philosophy Chamber: Art and Science in Harvard’s Teaching Cabinet, 1766-1820, seeks papers that investigate spaces of artistic, artisanal and intellectual production throughout global history. From artist’s studios to experimental laboratories, from offices to political chambers, rooms and their contents have long impacted history and transformed their inhabitants. We invite case studies that address questions like the following: How might an assemblage of objects within a given space intersect or clash with ideological narratives? How have secret or privileged rooms, or rooms to which access is limited, served to obfuscate and facilitate the generation and dissemination of ideas? As historians and critics, how should we interpret and recreate such spaces—many of which no longer exist?

The Philosophy Chamber exhibition, on view at the Harvard Art Museums from May 19 to December 31, 2017, will explore the history and collections of one of the most unusual rooms in early America. Between 1766 and 1820, the Philosophy Chamber, a grand room adjacent to the College Library on Harvard’s Campus, was home to more than one thousand artifacts, images and specimens. Named for the discipline of Natural Philosophy, a cornerstone of the college’s Enlightenment-era curriculum that wove together astronomy, mathematics, physics and other sciences interrogating natural objects and physical phenomena, the Philosophy Chamber served as a lecture hall, experimental lab, picture gallery and convening space. Frequented by an array of artists, scientists, travelers and revolutionaries, the room and its collections stood at the center of artistic and scholarly life at Harvard and the New England region for more than fifty years. The exhibition considers the wide-ranging conversations, debates, and ideas that animated this grand room and the objects and architectural elements that shaped, supported or unintentionally undermined these discourses.

Potential case study “rooms” include:

Teaching cabinets
Workshops
Civic spaces
Laboratories
Domestic spaces
Toxic rooms
Secret rooms
Studies or offices
Artist studios
Theaters
Classrooms or lecture halls
Chatrooms or other digital “rooms” and platforms
Museum and gallery installations
Exchanges
Train Stations
Ruins, war-torn rooms

Due the interdisciplinary nature of this symposium, we welcome proposals from a variety of fields, including art history, architectural history, material culture studies, history, English and literature studies, American studies, anthropology, and archaeology, as well as the fine arts.

To apply, please submit a 300-word abstract and two-page CV to laura_igoe@harvard.edu by April 15, 2017.


Symposium Announcement

The University of Pennsylvania Department of the History of Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, in partnership with the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, are pleased to announce an upcoming symposium:

Objects of Study: Paper, Ink, and the Material Turn
Kislak Center for Special Collections and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
March 31-April 1, 2017
http://www.objectsofstudy.com 

This symposium is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The goal of this symposium is to dissect the interpretive aims of “materiality studies” through a focused lens of works on paper. In recent years, “materiality” has become a buzzword across the humanities, and an impressive range of methods, investigative starting points, and analytic goals have come to rest under the term’s mantle. But in grouping this diverse array of approaches under a single heading, does each method’s unique potential risk becoming flattened and obscured? An illustrated book might just as easily inspire a reconsideration of workshop practices as it could a chemical investigation of ink formulae; are social history and chemistry, to name just these two examples, justifiably held together within the rubric of materiality?

The institutional landscape of object-based study has had a role to play in miscommunications about the goals of focusing on materiality. As art historians, we have noticed that materiality, as a concept, has often complicated communication between scholars of art objects in academic and museum settings. Conversations about process and the substance of things in the academy often veer quite far from the ways of engaging objects with which curators and conservators have long been deeply invested. In light of this muddled translation across institutions, we have chosen to focus this symposium on a single genre of objects that rely upon the materials of paper and ink. Books, prints, drawings, and documents, to name but a few examples, attract intense interest across not only museums and the academy but also libraries, archives, and antiquarian collections. By looking at the spectrum of approaches generated by these materials, this symposium works towards answering a pressing question: do the academy, museum, archive, and library define “materiality” differently? And, if so, what are future avenues towards intersection and collaboration?

The questions and objectives of this symposium have been shaped by the emerging field of “critical bibliography,” which unites scholars from a range of disciplinary and methodological backgrounds around the central axis of the book. We aim to map these connections onto art history by gathering academics, archivists, artists, conservators, and curators to think together about shared and divergent premises and, most importantly, goals for object-based study. The symposium will interweave hands-on workshops led by curators, conservators and artists with public talks by materially-focused scholars. In turn, discussions will not solely center on formal presentations, but will extend to alternative venues: the conservation lab, the studio, and the study room. Participants will present “materialist” case studies of 20 minutes in length, with 5 additional minutes devoted to explicitly addressing how “materiality” operates in their work. What are the analytic goals of a materially focused account? Where and how does such an inquiry begin? And, finally, how do those aims and methods relate to the field’s broader material turn? Talks will engage these questions in relationship to works on paper across time, and a range of geographic origins.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Nancy Ash, Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Cathleen A. Baker, University of Michigan Library
  • Julie Nelson Davis, University of Pennsylvania
  • Michael Gaudio, University of Minnesota
  • Barbara Heritage, Rare Book School at the University of Virginia
  • Daniel Heyman, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
  • Christopher Heuer, the Clark Institute of Art
  • Shelley Langdale, Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Barbara Mundy, Fordham University
  • Andrew Raftery, Rhode Island School of Design
  • Jennifer Roberts, Harvard University
  • Elizabeth Savage, Institute for Advanced Studies, University of London
  • Madeleine Viljoen, New York Public Library

For more information and to register, please visit http://www.objectsofstudy.com.


Symposium Announcement

The College of William and Mary (W&M) in Williamsburg, Virginia invites interested scholars to attend and participate in the Sixteenth Annual Graduate Research Symposium (GRS) to be held at the Sadler Center in March 24-25, 2017.  A unique educational and networking event, the GRS encourages interdisciplinary exchange, bringing together students from the sciences and the humanities at William & Mary and other surrounding regional universities.  The GRS promises to be an exciting opportunity to share experiences common to students in all graduate school communities.

2017 Graduate Research Symposium
March 24-25, 2017
William & Mary
Sadler Center
Williamsburg, Virginia
grs@wm.edu
http://www.wm.edu/as/grs

 Please visit webpage http://www.wm.edu/as/grs for further information and details.


Title: The Room Where It Happens: On the Agency of Interior Spaces
When:October 13-14, 2017
Where: The Harvard Art Museums
Deadline: April 15, 2017

This symposium, held in conjunction with the Harvard Art Museum’s forthcoming exhibition, The Philosophy Chamber: Art and Science in Harvard’s Teaching Cabinet, 1766-1820, seeks papers that investigate spaces of artistic, artisanal and intellectual production throughout global history. From artist’s studios to experimental laboratories, from offices to political chambers, rooms and their contents have long impacted history and transformed their inhabitants. We invite case studies that address questions like the following: How might an assemblage of objects within a given space intersect or clash with ideological narratives? How have secret or privileged rooms, or rooms to which access is limited, served to obfuscate and facilitate the generation and dissemination of ideas? As historians and critics, how should we interpret and recreate such spaces—many of which no longer exist?

The Philosophy Chamber exhibition, on view at the Harvard Art Museums from May 19 to December 31, 2017, will explore the history and collections of one of the most unusual rooms in early America. Between 1766 and 1820, the Philosophy Chamber, a grand room adjacent to the College Library on Harvard’s Campus, was home to more than one thousand artifacts, images and specimens. Named for the discipline of Natural Philosophy, a cornerstone of the college’s Enlightenment-era curriculum that wove together astronomy, mathematics, physics and other sciences interrogating natural objects and physical phenomena, the Philosophy Chamber served as a lecture hall, experimental lab, picture gallery and convening space. Frequented by an array of artists, scientists, travelers and revolutionaries, the room and its collections stood at the center of artistic and scholarly life at Harvard and the New England region for more than fifty years. The exhibition considers the wide-ranging conversations, debates, and ideas that animated this grand room and the objects and architectural elements that shaped, supported or unintentionally undermined these discourses.

Potential case study “rooms” include:
•    Teaching cabinets
•    Workshops
•    Civic spaces
•    Laboratories
•    Domestic spaces
•    Toxic rooms
•    Secret rooms
•    Studies or offices
•    Artist studios
•    Theaters
•    Classrooms or lecture halls
•    Chatrooms or other digital “rooms” and platforms
•    Museum and gallery installations
•    Exchanges
•    Train Stations
•    Ruins, war-torn rooms

Due the interdisciplinary nature of this symposium, we welcome proposals from a variety of fields, including art history, architectural history, material culture studies, history, English and literature studies, American studies, anthropology, and archaeology, as well as the fine arts.

To apply, please submit a 300-word abstract and two-page CV to laura_igoe@harvard.edu by April 15, 2017.