Of Interest to UD Community: CFPs, etc.

Calls for Papers are listed in chronological order according to their deadlines for submissions.
Symposium Announcements are below.


Title: Good, Fast, Cheap: Printed Words & Images in America before 1900
When: October 6-7, 2017
Where: American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts
Deadline: March 15, 2017

Call for Proposals

APHA and CHAViC invite proposals that explore the production, distribution, reception, and survival of printed words and images in America to 1900. In an era in which the process of design had not been separated from production, the purpose of the conference is to explore the inter-relation between composition, design, and printing processes.
 The goal of clear communication was often coupled with a deadline and a budget. In the face of these constraints, printers used the materials and equipment at their disposal to design and produce necessary items in the service of democracy, education, science, commerce, entertainment, and the arts. The inventiveness and problem solving resulted in work ranging from the pedestrian to the sublime and that might, when considered carefully, offer lessons for today’s communications environment. How can the past inform the present and the future? How can the study of continuity and change through printing history inform contemporary design?
 Proposals are encouraged from disparate disciplines including art history, American studies, book arts, graphic design, practicing artists and printers, history, English, childhood studies, and material culture studies.

Sara T. Sauers, APHA VP for Programs | printinghistory.org | sara-sauers@uiowa.edu
Nan Wolverton, CHAViC Director, AAS | americanantiquarian.org | nwolverton@mwa.org


Title: The Room Where It Happens: On the Agency of Interior Spaces
When: October 13-14, 2017
Where: Harvard Art Museums
Deadline: April 15, 2017

Keynote Speaker:
Louis Nelson, University of Virginia

This symposium, held in conjunction with the Harvard Art Museum’s forthcoming exhibition, The Philosophy Chamber: Art and Science in Harvard’s Teaching Cabinet, 1766-1820, seeks papers that investigate spaces of artistic, artisanal and intellectual production throughout global history. From artist’s studios to experimental laboratories, from offices to political chambers, rooms and their contents have long impacted history and transformed their inhabitants. We invite case studies that address questions like the following: How might an assemblage of objects within a given space intersect or clash with ideological narratives? How have secret or privileged rooms, or rooms to which access is limited, served to obfuscate and facilitate the generation and dissemination of ideas? As historians and critics, how should we interpret and recreate such spaces—many of which no longer exist?

The Philosophy Chamber exhibition, on view at the Harvard Art Museums from May 19 to December 31, 2017, will explore the history and collections of one of the most unusual rooms in early America. Between 1766 and 1820, the Philosophy Chamber, a grand room adjacent to the College Library on Harvard’s Campus, was home to more than one thousand artifacts, images and specimens. Named for the discipline of Natural Philosophy, a cornerstone of the college’s Enlightenment-era curriculum that wove together astronomy, mathematics, physics and other sciences interrogating natural objects and physical phenomena, the Philosophy Chamber served as a lecture hall, experimental lab, picture gallery and convening space. Frequented by an array of artists, scientists, travelers and revolutionaries, the room and its collections stood at the center of artistic and scholarly life at Harvard and the New England region for more than fifty years. The exhibition considers the wide-ranging conversations, debates, and ideas that animated this grand room and the objects and architectural elements that shaped, supported or unintentionally undermined these discourses.

Potential case study “rooms” include:

Teaching cabinets
Workshops
Civic spaces
Laboratories
Domestic spaces
Toxic rooms
Secret rooms
Studies or offices
Artist studios
Theaters
Classrooms or lecture halls
Chatrooms or other digital “rooms” and platforms
Museum and gallery installations
Exchanges
Train Stations
Ruins, war-torn rooms

Due the interdisciplinary nature of this symposium, we welcome proposals from a variety of fields, including art history, architectural history, material culture studies, history, English and literature studies, American studies, anthropology, and archaeology, as well as the fine arts.

To apply, please submit a 300-word abstract and two-page CV to laura_igoe@harvard.edu by April 15, 2017.


Symposium Announcement

The University of Pennsylvania Department of the History of Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, in partnership with the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, are pleased to announce an upcoming symposium:

Objects of Study: Paper, Ink, and the Material Turn
Kislak Center for Special Collections and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
March 31-April 1, 2017
http://www.objectsofstudy.com 

This symposium is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The goal of this symposium is to dissect the interpretive aims of “materiality studies” through a focused lens of works on paper. In recent years, “materiality” has become a buzzword across the humanities, and an impressive range of methods, investigative starting points, and analytic goals have come to rest under the term’s mantle. But in grouping this diverse array of approaches under a single heading, does each method’s unique potential risk becoming flattened and obscured? An illustrated book might just as easily inspire a reconsideration of workshop practices as it could a chemical investigation of ink formulae; are social history and chemistry, to name just these two examples, justifiably held together within the rubric of materiality?

The institutional landscape of object-based study has had a role to play in miscommunications about the goals of focusing on materiality. As art historians, we have noticed that materiality, as a concept, has often complicated communication between scholars of art objects in academic and museum settings. Conversations about process and the substance of things in the academy often veer quite far from the ways of engaging objects with which curators and conservators have long been deeply invested. In light of this muddled translation across institutions, we have chosen to focus this symposium on a single genre of objects that rely upon the materials of paper and ink. Books, prints, drawings, and documents, to name but a few examples, attract intense interest across not only museums and the academy but also libraries, archives, and antiquarian collections. By looking at the spectrum of approaches generated by these materials, this symposium works towards answering a pressing question: do the academy, museum, archive, and library define “materiality” differently? And, if so, what are future avenues towards intersection and collaboration?

The questions and objectives of this symposium have been shaped by the emerging field of “critical bibliography,” which unites scholars from a range of disciplinary and methodological backgrounds around the central axis of the book. We aim to map these connections onto art history by gathering academics, archivists, artists, conservators, and curators to think together about shared and divergent premises and, most importantly, goals for object-based study. The symposium will interweave hands-on workshops led by curators, conservators and artists with public talks by materially-focused scholars. In turn, discussions will not solely center on formal presentations, but will extend to alternative venues: the conservation lab, the studio, and the study room. Participants will present “materialist” case studies of 20 minutes in length, with 5 additional minutes devoted to explicitly addressing how “materiality” operates in their work. What are the analytic goals of a materially focused account? Where and how does such an inquiry begin? And, finally, how do those aims and methods relate to the field’s broader material turn? Talks will engage these questions in relationship to works on paper across time, and a range of geographic origins.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Nancy Ash, Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Cathleen A. Baker, University of Michigan Library
  • Julie Nelson Davis, University of Pennsylvania
  • Michael Gaudio, University of Minnesota
  • Barbara Heritage, Rare Book School at the University of Virginia
  • Daniel Heyman, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
  • Christopher Heuer, the Clark Institute of Art
  • Shelley Langdale, Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Barbara Mundy, Fordham University
  • Andrew Raftery, Rhode Island School of Design
  • Jennifer Roberts, Harvard University
  • Elizabeth Savage, Institute for Advanced Studies, University of London
  • Madeleine Viljoen, New York Public Library

For more information and to register, please visit http://www.objectsofstudy.com.


Symposium Announcement

The College of William and Mary (W&M) in Williamsburg, Virginia invites interested scholars to attend and participate in the Sixteenth Annual Graduate Research Symposium (GRS) to be held at the Sadler Center in March 24-25, 2017.  A unique educational and networking event, the GRS encourages interdisciplinary exchange, bringing together students from the sciences and the humanities at William & Mary and other surrounding regional universities.  The GRS promises to be an exciting opportunity to share experiences common to students in all graduate school communities.

2017 Graduate Research Symposium
March 24-25, 2017
William & Mary
Sadler Center
Williamsburg, Virginia
grs@wm.edu
http://www.wm.edu/as/grs

 Please visit webpage http://www.wm.edu/as/grs for further information and details.


Title: The Room Where It Happens: On the Agency of Interior Spaces
When:October 13-14, 2017
Where: The Harvard Art Museums
Deadline: April 15, 2017

This symposium, held in conjunction with the Harvard Art Museum’s forthcoming exhibition, The Philosophy Chamber: Art and Science in Harvard’s Teaching Cabinet, 1766-1820, seeks papers that investigate spaces of artistic, artisanal and intellectual production throughout global history. From artist’s studios to experimental laboratories, from offices to political chambers, rooms and their contents have long impacted history and transformed their inhabitants. We invite case studies that address questions like the following: How might an assemblage of objects within a given space intersect or clash with ideological narratives? How have secret or privileged rooms, or rooms to which access is limited, served to obfuscate and facilitate the generation and dissemination of ideas? As historians and critics, how should we interpret and recreate such spaces—many of which no longer exist?

The Philosophy Chamber exhibition, on view at the Harvard Art Museums from May 19 to December 31, 2017, will explore the history and collections of one of the most unusual rooms in early America. Between 1766 and 1820, the Philosophy Chamber, a grand room adjacent to the College Library on Harvard’s Campus, was home to more than one thousand artifacts, images and specimens. Named for the discipline of Natural Philosophy, a cornerstone of the college’s Enlightenment-era curriculum that wove together astronomy, mathematics, physics and other sciences interrogating natural objects and physical phenomena, the Philosophy Chamber served as a lecture hall, experimental lab, picture gallery and convening space. Frequented by an array of artists, scientists, travelers and revolutionaries, the room and its collections stood at the center of artistic and scholarly life at Harvard and the New England region for more than fifty years. The exhibition considers the wide-ranging conversations, debates, and ideas that animated this grand room and the objects and architectural elements that shaped, supported or unintentionally undermined these discourses.

Potential case study “rooms” include:
•    Teaching cabinets
•    Workshops
•    Civic spaces
•    Laboratories
•    Domestic spaces
•    Toxic rooms
•    Secret rooms
•    Studies or offices
•    Artist studios
•    Theaters
•    Classrooms or lecture halls
•    Chatrooms or other digital “rooms” and platforms
•    Museum and gallery installations
•    Exchanges
•    Train Stations
•    Ruins, war-torn rooms

Due the interdisciplinary nature of this symposium, we welcome proposals from a variety of fields, including art history, architectural history, material culture studies, history, English and literature studies, American studies, anthropology, and archaeology, as well as the fine arts.

To apply, please submit a 300-word abstract and two-page CV to laura_igoe@harvard.edu by April 15, 2017.


Title: Fashion And Media
When: October 13-14, 2017
Where: Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
Deadline: Rolling Deadline August 1, 2017

Fashion is signified and utilized through various forms of media. In this  Fashion And Media Symposium we will focus on how fashion is portrayed in all types of media. Presentations should examine the representations and expressions of fashion, apparel, garments, clothing, and textiles in various forms. Whether examining the latest technological innovations in fashion design, merchandising, retailing or how clothing is portrayed in paintings and sculpture, to the use of social media allowing an individual to show the latest clothing they purchased to friends, this symposium aims to push the envelope of scholarship to gain new understandings about the visual expression of fashion, apparel, garments, clothing and textiles through all media types. From the historical to the contemporary – the technological to fine artistic expression, Fashion And Media aims to be international in scope and represent a wide variety of disciplines, with a particular emphasis on perspectives and approaches from the humanities,  arts and social sciences.

Presentation Outcomes
All abstracts will be double-blind peer-reviewed and those accepted will give a 20 minute presentation at our conference in concurrent sessions.
We also welcome visual works and design, see our website: http://fashionandmedia.westphal.drexel.edu

Publication Outcomes
The broad nature of fashion in relation to media and culture allows for a wide variety of articles.  For many academics what counts towards publication varies by country, institutions of learning, and where a particular participant is in their academic career. This symposium will have all abstracts published with various other outlets for full paper publication. Final papers will have the possibility to be published in a book or an indexed journal. All abstract submissions for this conference will be double blind peer-reviewed prior to acceptance. Those who would like to pursue publication in a book or indexed journal will have the option. Final submissions will be reviewed for ultimate outcomes. The conference chair Dr. Joseph H. Hancock, II is working with Intellect Publishers to provide these opportunities for all who participate.

Abstracts, artwork, design and papers will be reviewed on a rolling basis see our website for details: http://fashionandmedia.westphal.drexel.edu

Those with questions should email Dr. Joseph H. Hancock, II at jhh33@drexel.edu.